Green Room

One of the most striking things about Green Room – probably not THE most striking, but perhaps the most unusually striking – is the way in which people have weird reactions to dangerous situations. The premise of this film (penniless punk band is held captive after witnessing a murder at a neo-Nazi bar) would seem to lend itself to outright, unending terror. And while there is a lot of that – and it could very well be perfectly great if it went whole hog in that direction – it pushes into surprising territory by allowing for a few moments to breathe.

People remain people no matter who they are. The adrenaline that spikes in a crisis may promote certain behavior, but the basic stew of chemicals and emotions remain. So Green Room distinguishes itself by not relying thoroughly on the screams. Instead, there is a whole array of chuckles, blank stares, and even a few shoulder shrugs. The lesson seems to be that when facing a guy as in control as Darcy Banker (Patrick Stewart, as indelible as you’ve heard), it is best for everyone to remember that they are still who they are, and that they all have their own unique set of qualities. They might just help you survive (emphasis on might).

I give Green Room 9 Machetes out of 10 Lockdowns and 19 Shotgun Pellets out of 20 Attack Dogs.

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